Thesis Methodology

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Section 3 of your thesis is your methodology – the section in which you provide the details of how you actually conducted your research and gathered your data. The goal of this section is of course to explain what you did, why it was the right methodology for your research, and, as well, to provide enough detail that someone else could replicate it if so desired.
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Thesis Methodology Section

Section 3 of your thesis is your methodology – the section in which you provide the details of how you actually conducted your research and gathered your data. The goal of this section is of course to explain what you did, why it was the right methodology for your research, and, as well, to provide enough detail that someone else could replicate it if so desired. This section must include the following:

  1. The subject(s) of your research (who or what you are examining)
  2. What it is you are examining
  3. How you will examine what you examine – for example, is your study quantitative or qualitative, a case study, or mixed, etc.
  4. How you will collect the data
  5. How you will organize and present the data

The Sub-Sections of Your Methodology Section

  1. An Explanation of Your Methods

Here you will provide the details of how our research study was conducted and, as well, justify how the methods you chose were the correct ones for what you have chosen to research. How will these methods serve the purpose of your research, in other words? For example, if you are conducting a study on the impact of student performance of a specific learning strategy, your study will be quantitative and you will probably have an experimental and a control group; if on the other hand, you want to study the response of a particular group of people to a new community improvement program, then your study will be qualitative and you may take a random sampling survey.

  1. Information about Your Population or Sampling

You will need to provide a detailed description of your research population or subjects (subjects usually refers to animals or inanimate objects; population usually refers to humans). Provide such things as demographic information (e.g., children from an inner city poverty neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland or fresh water from a creek in Northern Virginia). This is important, because some may want to replicate your study in a similar environment with the same demographic, but in a different part of the country or world.

  1. Explanation of the data you intend to collect.

If you intend to study the impact of a new educational program on a student population, and you will have an experimental and control group, then each group must bear the same characteristics. You will then explain the data you will collect – grades on tests, scores on standardized tests, discipline and attendance records, etc. If, on the other hand, you are looking at the efficacy of a particular water treatment protocol vs. one that is already in use, then you will compare the results of both treatments on a significant number of samplings.

  1. Description and Inclusion of Your Instruments

If you will be using specific instruments to gather your data, you must include them – surveys, data gathering forms, etc. Have these instruments been used before and have they been validated? Have you devised your own instruments and how did you determine what should be included? In the case of the educational study, the instruments will be those that the school already has – grade reporting system, standardized tests, and disciplinary/attendance records.

Why Students Struggle with the Methodology Section

This is a section that an advisor or committee will scrutinize very carefully, so students know it has to be done right. If the justification for the methods is not clear and really thought out, for example, a committee member may quickly catch that and insist upon a re-write. It is not unusual for students to re-write their methodology sections several times, usually because the “run it by” their advisors, and the advisors suggest changes that will ultimately allow it to be approved. It can be frustrating, of course, but remember the goal is to get it finished and to get that degree. And, when that frustration becomes too much, then it is time to get the kind of professional help that EssayRepublic.com can give you.

Let an Expert Take Over

EssayRepublic.com has a large number of Ph.D. academics who not only have written their own theses and dissertations but who have helped many students write theirs. They are true scholars in their fields and understand what academic research at the graduate level must be. When you contact us for help with your methodology section, you will get a Ph.D. scholar in your field who is intimately familiar with solid research methodologies of any type.

You will upload to your consultant all of your materials for your methodology section, and that consultant will weave it all into a superb methodology section that includes all of the detail and all of the explanations and justifications that you need. It will be sent back to you for approval, and you may request any changes you want. In the end, you will have had the confidential help that will get that section plenty of praise.

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